Safe driving tips from Court Street Ford

teendriver_002

BOURBONNAIS, IL – In recognition of National Teen Driver Safety Week, Oct. 20-26, Court Street Ford is releasing a list of safe driving tips for teens, adults and passengers alike. Now in its seventh year, National Teen Driver Safety Week is a time designated by Congress annually to raise awareness of teen driver safety topics and to encourage safe teen driver and passenger behavior.

“We want to help make the drive safer for teens,” said Jeff Chiero. “The importance of safety belt use and understanding the risk of distraction are key examples of topics parents and teachers should be emphasizing with younger drivers routinely.” 

Safe driving tips from Court Street Ford

  • Many states limit the number of passengers new drivers can have in a vehicle. But even drivers who are allowed to carry passengers should focus on driving and keep their eyes on the road when talking. Remember, seemingly simple tasks can be distracting
  • Parents can set a good example by putting down the phone when driving, making only necessary calls using hands-free technology or after safely pulling over
  • Always buckle up and require all passengers to buckle up for everyone’s safety
  • Remember that the faster you drive, the longer it takes to stop. Doubling vehicle speed can nearly quadruple the distance required to stop
  • Don’t drink or use drugs, especially behind the wheel. Under-age use of alcohol and illicit drugs is illegal, and combining alcohol or drugs with driving can be deadly at any age 

Distracted driving, a growing concern

Distracted driving is a concern for parents of inexperienced drivers, and Ford’s “Do Not Disturb” feature helps control one risk factor. When paired with Ford SYNC, “Do Not Disturb” blocks incoming phone calls or text messages. Calls are diverted to voicemail and text messages are saved on the device for later viewing. Drivers can still make voice-activated outgoing calls, and SYNC 911 Assist® can still make a call in case of emergency. 

Ford and teen drivers

Parents who have a Ford vehicle equipped with MyKey® technology can encourage teenagers to wear their safety belts, keep the radio volume down, watch their speed and pay attention to the road – not their cell phones – simply by programming the teen’s key. It’s an exclusive technology that is available on more than 6 million Ford and Lincoln vehicles.

mykey

Ford has also developed a comprehensive driving skills program, with free professional driver instruction, called ‘Ford Driving Skills for Life.” Developed with the Governors Highway Safety Association, Ford Driving Skills for Life is designed to supplement standard driver education programs and has trained more than 500,000 new drivers through free online and professional hands-on instruction. You can find more information, free materials for parents and educators and a Web-based curriculum that includes “The Academy” on www.drivingskillsforlife.com.

Ford also sponsors the Parent’s Supervised Driving Program, a multistate effort to help teens learn important skills while working to earn their driver’s license. The program is geared toward skill development and expanding the conditions and time teens drive with their parents prior to driving independently.

Parents can learn more about about the Parent’s Supervised Driving Program at http://www.theparentssuperviseddrivingprogram.com/. Information about MyKey technology is available at http://www.ford.com/.

More information about National Teen Driver Safety week is available at www.teendriversource.org.

# # #

About Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles across six continents. With about 177,000 employees and 65 plants worldwide, the company’s automotive brands include Ford and Lincoln. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford and its products worldwide, please visit http://corporate.ford.com.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s